Tag Archives: petit village

Muscovado: A Good Alternative to Refined Sugar

Muscovado is a thick, unrefined sugar that has a rich smell and is moist and thick. The good thing about this sugar is that is contains minerals because it has not gone through the stripping down and processing of other sugars. when it is highly processed, sugar is turned into an ‘empty-calorie’ product that contains nothing of nutritional benefit.  Replacing your usual white sugar with muscovado sugar at home can help lower the amount of ‘empty calories’ you consume.

The extraction process of muscovado sugar is very simple; the extracted juice from the sugar cane is boiled until it has reduced to about 30 percent. The residue is then dried out and it solidifies to form the sugar granules known as muscovado sugar. In comparison, white sugar undergoes additional heating, filtering and bleaching stages, which removes most of its nutritional content in the process. Another health benefit muscovado sugar has over refined sugar is that it is free of harmful chemicals such as phosphoric acid, sulfur dioxide and formic acid, which may be put in during the additional stages white sugar goes through.

Seriously, do you want to eat bleach? No, that’s what I though.
So, how can you substitute your scary white sugar with this delicous vitamin-filled sugar?
Muscovado sugar is most commonly used in baking. You can also add it to your tea and coffee or substitute it wherever you would normally use white sugar. When substituting your sugar, use exactly the same amount of muscovado sugar as you would white sugar.
For those of you that get worried about spending lots on healthy substitutes, you’ll be happy to know that is really isn’t expensive. I bought a kilo for around 9 euros.For maximum health benefits, try baking carrot cakes, oat and raisin cookies, fruity muffins, apple and cinnamon crumbles and apple strudels. You can also use muscovado sugar in savory dishes such as mustard-glazed gammon, caramelized balsamic steak, and more!
Recipes to come, my lovely readers.
Here and here are some links about why you should be careful of your sugar intake. I always cut down the sugar in my recipes.

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In Oh La La Livia’s Kitchen This Week

I am always curious to see what food people buy, I love looking in fridges (that seems strange?). So I thought you may be interested in seeing how I filled my fridge this week.

The weather is getting cooler, so I changed my vegetable and fruit selection. I am favouring fruits that I can grill with unrefined sugar and vanilla and vegetables that I can put in soups and roasts.

Figs: What better way to eat them than grilled with herbs of Provence and served with fresh goat’s cheese?

I have been meaning to get my hands on some himalayan salt. I finally did and boy is it tasty!
But what can it do for you I hear you ask? This is by far the purest salt available on earth and is absolutely uncontaminated with any toxins or pollutants. Some other great things it can do for you:

  1. Regulate the water content throughout your body.
  2. Promotes a healthy pH balance in your cells, particularly your brain cells.
  3. Promotes blood sugar health and helping to reduce the signs of aging.
  4. Assists in the generation of hydroelectric energy in cells in your body.
  5. Absorbs food particles through your intestinal tract.
  6. Supports respiratory health.
  7. Promotes sinus health.
  8. Prevents muscle cramps.
  9. Promotes bone strength.
  10. Regulates your sleep — it naturally promotes sleep.
  11. Supports your libido. (WOOOP!)
  12. Promotes vascular health.
  13. In conjunction with water it is actually essential for the regulation of your blood pressure.

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR PEOPLE?

But what really made my day was the Turkish coffee gift I received from my lovely friend Emily. You can see my priorities are right, but come on, Turkish coffee is just so great.

With a spoonful of this unrefined, unaltered brown sugar it makes it even more delicious.

More details to come about this wonder sugar very soon.

What new additions do you have in your kitchen this week?

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A Sunny Afternoon in Aix en Provence.

On our way to get the boat from Marseille to Bastia we had an afternoon in Aix en Provence. It’s a city with many fountains, and the vibe and culture are polar opposites to Paris.

Being only thirty minutes away from Marseille, it really feels like a Mediterranean paradise. The apartments are precious and the cobble stones remind the people that walk on them of France’s long history.

I couldn’t resist, this olive and fig bread looked so good so I got some to snack on with fresh goats cheese.

Entre la mer et la montagne il y a Bastia.

Throughout history, Bastia was a rich city thanks to its geographical situation, being between the mountains and the water. For many centuries it was a wealthy city. The people of Bastia saw the city destroyed during WWII but its economic importance for Corsica is still high.

Walking around Bastia gave me a great idea of the previous glory and wealth of Bastia. A lot of the apartments need renovating. It feels like an old world enchanted city.

The presence and respect of Napoleon is also very strong, even after all these years.

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Saint Florent, where all the million euro yachts meet.

Saint Florent would be the Corsican version of Saint Tropez. It is wealthy, a display of the rich in their expensive attire and million-euro yachts. Despite this, it still remains more authentic, less “bling-bling”, and the wilderness is preserved. The Corsican’s sure know how to protect their wild island.

Below friends, is the Corsican flag. It was adopted by General of the Nation Pasquale di Paoli  in 1755 and was based on a traditional flag used previously. It portrays a Moor’s Head in black wearing a white bandana above his eyes on a white background.

Since the 11th century, the Moor’s Head has been a symbol of an African’s Head. The Moor was originally a female Moor blindfolded and wearing a necklace made of beads. No use is attested prior to 1736, when it was used by both sides during the struggle for independence.

In 1760, Genera Pasquale Paoli ordered the necklace to be removed from the head and the blindfold raised. His reason, reported by his biographers, was “Les Corses veulent y voir clair. La liberté doit marcher au flambeau de la philosophie. Ne dirait-on pas que nous craignons la lumière ?” (roughly translated: “The Corsicans want to see clearly. Freedom must walk by the torch of philosophy. Won’t they say that we fear the light?”) Later the blindfold was changed to a headband.

This pretty much sums up the Corsican mentality.

I spoke to a Corsican man and he told me that the Moor’s head was a man from Morocco.

Wonderful fresh pasta filled with typical Corsica cheese “brousse”.

If you have not yet been to Corsica, put it on your list of things to do next Summer!

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A grilled vegetable salad in Erbalunga.

Erbalunga, which is in the “Cap Corse” region of Corsica stole my heart. It feels enchanted. You really can imagine Napoleon in these parts of the world. To make things even more magical, the weather was perfect.

Our week in Corsica followed the coast. We went from town to town, each as charming as the next.

In Corsica most of the houses are covered in some kind of vine.

How sweet is the life of this Corsican cat?

The grilled salad was so fresh, and was a perfect accompagnement to the sun. The feature of the salad was the crumb fried mozarella. I am going to teach myself how to do it to recreate this mind-blowing salad.

My lovely little friend Zoé. She had a hot goat’s cheese salad.

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Centuri, where I ate seafood at the harbourside.

This town stole my heart. And my belly. Centuri is an old fishing town and I ate so well here. The colours are so whimsical and romantic.

Even the bouganvilla looked extra pretty in Centuri.

Isn’t this door just brilliant?!

In Corsica you often see the washing hung up to dry out the windows.

Seafood spaghetti… What I would do for that again today.

The seafood platter, it was so fresh.

What a happy day!

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la Corse, un des plus bels endroit du monde.

Ca fait deux ans depuis que je n’y suis pas allée. Je suis tellement amoureuse de cet île sauvage, belle et insolente. On va bien manger, dormir, nager, marcher. Je reviendrai à Paris l’esprit plus clair, reposé… la belle vie quoi!

Quelques photos de nos vacances en Corse il y a deux ans. Comme quoi le temps passe vite!

A dans une semaine xx

Warm Zucchini and Beetroot Salad with a Grilled Vegetable Side

We had unlimited access to a glorious garden two weekends ago. I was in heaven. I invented this recipe to celebrate the fact that we had sun, great company, fresh vegetables and lovely conversation.

For this recipe you will need:

2 round zucchini
2 regular zucchinis
2 beetroots
big bunch of fresh basil
big bunch of fresh parsley
2 eggplants
olive oil
crème fraîche

Cup up everything like in the photos below.

You will use the round zucchinis for the warm salad part, and the regular zucchinis for the grilled side.

Put olive oil (I also use coconut oil to cook) in a pan and start pan cooking the round zucchinis. Add in salt and garlic and onion, but don’t put in the herbs until the very end or else they will burn.

Put in the small pieces of beetroot. You will see, they make the dish a wonderful colour and give it such an earthy flavour.

You can now put in all the herbs.

When serving, dollop on about 3 tablespoons of crème fraîche while still warm. Serve this dish warm, it is more tasty.

In other news, I am loving this video, despite it being über cheesy.

J and I did a great tour of the Saint Ouen flea markets with Charlotte from Haute Curiosité.

Tomorrow I am going to Corsica until next Tuesday.

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Madame Chose et toutes ses belles choses

Madame Chose et les Batignolles

Ce coin du 17e est comme un petit village! Ils sont tous amis, ils se parlent, ils se connaissent. Il faut dire, à Paris ce n’est pas tout à fait courant. Dans le carré formé par les rue de Levis, Nollet, Cardinet, l’avenue de Clichy et le boulevard des Batignolles, ce mini-quartier aux accents rétro regorge d’adresses mignonnes! Tu peux facilement y passer la journée.

On attend de voir des prix très élevés mais son tout est de nous faire des petits prix, pour que ces objets soient accessibles à tous. On a l’impression d’être en Provence un dimanche aux marchés de puces.

Cette boutique est ouverte depuis septembre, et propose de petits meubles pour nos appartements parisiens. Mélanie a un super goût et trouve des trésors qu’on ne trouve pas facilement ailleurs! On trouve pour adultes et enfants, des chaises, des lampes, du linge de maison ancien reteint, des meubles, de la vaisselle et des horloges charmantes.

Ce qui fait sa charme, c’est qu’elle choisi elle-même ses objets en province et en très bon état. Sur commande, elle peut rechercher des pièces précises et les transformer pour vous. Quelle fille douée!

Pots vintages de Belgique, entre €6-7 euros le pot.

Cloche à gâteau vintage environ €65. Je l’ai à la maison, je n’ai pas pu résister!


Beaucoup de trésors que Madame Chose trouve partout en France, des vraies pièces vintages, et à petit prix!

Où acheter des belles choses?

Chez Madame Chose,
94, rue Nollet
75017 Paris

01 46 27 31 14
http://www.madamechose.fr