Tag Archives: coconut oil

A Provincial grilled vegetable pasta dish

Summer meals are the best.

Recipe:
1 eggplant
1 zucchini
spices to season
a bunch of basil
a bunch of parsley
wholegrain organic pasta
fresh goat’s cheese

grill up the vegetables in coconut oil with the spices. Add half of the basil while cooking, and the other half at the end once everything has been cooked. Serve on freshly cooked pasta and add the goat’s cheese. Add some of the parsley for an extra fresh flavour.

Les repas d’été sont les meilleurs!

Recette:
1 aubergine
1 courgette
des épices que vous aimez
bouquet de basilic
bouquet de persil
des pâtes bio completes
du chèvre frais

grillez les légumes dans l’huile de noix de coco avec les épices. Ajouter la moitié du basilic pendant la cuisson, et l’autre moitié à la fin une fois que tout a été cuit. Servir sur des pâtes fraîchement cuites et ajouter le fromage de chèvre. Ajoutez un peu de persil pour un goût frais supplémentaire.

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Chai Energy Balls

Chai is one of my favourite things in this world. Its warming mix is just what I need on a cold day but also on Spring days like today, when the weather can’t make it’s mind up and goes from hot to cold. This is very bad for my vata, when the weather changes a lot, and chai helps me keep in balanced and feeling grounded.

The chai I’m talking about is an ancient Indian spiced tea, traditionally known as Masala Chai and is said to have dated back some 5,000 years ago. Its unique flavour comes from a blend of Ayurvedic herbs and spices. Ayurveda is the traditional Vedic Indian medicine which means “knowledge for life” and is said to be the sister science to yoga. Yoga has so much theory intertwined, it is considered a “science” or body of knowledge.

Chai helps fight off colds, keep you warm and provide immunity.

You can re-create other recipes that are based on the concept of chai, like chai cakes and these chai energy balls. They are like my amazeballs, but an ayurvedic version of.

You will need:
300g of dates
as many cardamom pods as you want (I put in a bunch as you can see in the photo, it’s one of my favourite spices and it’s not overpowering in this mixture)
a big chunk of fresh ginger, skinned
a couple of teaspoons of cocoa
a pinch of nutmeg
two tablespoons of coconut oil
almond meal and desiccated coconut

soak the dates and cardamom pods overnight. Take out the pips of the dates and put them in a mixing bowl. Squeeze out the seeds of the cardamom pods and throw away the pods. Put in all of the other ingredients, apart from the almond meal and desiccated coconut and blend until completely smooth. I sometimes put in a shot of good quality coffee to make the flavour richer. Add in the almond meal and desiccated coconut until the mixture is firm enough to roll into balls.

Makes 12 energy balls.

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French Onion Soup

There is nothing better to warm yourself up in Winter than a bowl of steaming French onion soup.
Onion soups have been popular at least as far back as Roman times. They were, throughout history, seen as food for poor people, as onions were plentiful and easy to grow. The modern version of this soup originates in France in the 18th century, made from beef broth, and caramelized onions. It is often finished by being placed under a grill in a ramekin traditionally with croutons and gruyère melted on top. The crouton on top is reminiscent of ancient soups.

Today, it is still a soup that don’t cost a lot to make but is not at all seen as a soup for the poor (not that we care because it’s delicious! It’s just interesting to see how things change with time).

french onion soup oh la la livia

french onion soup oh la la livia

For two people I used:

8 brown onions
Teaspoon of coconut oil
Herbes de Provence
Bay leaves
6 cloves of garlic
Gruyère

Fry up the onion in the coconut oil until they are soft. Now add them to a saucepan with the coconut oil (this doesn’t flavour the soup at all, it’s just the healthy option, see here for details.) Now add about 5 cups of water and keep adding water when the levels get low. Keep it simmering on low for a couple of hours.

French Onion Soup with croutons by Oh la la Livia

French Onion Soup with croutons by Oh la la Livia

For the croutons, I put them in the oven with cheese on them and placed them on the top of the soup.
Delish! Enjoy and keep warm this Winter

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Pumpkin and Ginger Soup for Halloween

After being bed-ridden yesterday with the nasty germs that are going around Paris at the moment, and being Halloween, I thought that seeing I can’t go out dressed up with gruesome make up on I’ll make myself a pumpkin soup for the occasion!

This soup is for two people:

500g of pumpkin
1 onion
2cm of ginger
Herbes de Provence
4 cloves of garlic
Coconut oil (and not olive oil! Click here to find out why)

Cut up the pumpkin, onion, ginger and place them in the baking tray with coconut oil. Sprinkle on the herbes de provence. Bake for around 60 minutes and 20 minutes before taking the tray out of the oven, add in the garlic.

Blend everything up and serve with a dollop of crème fraîche, chia seeds and some lime rind for zest.

I am so in love with the Autumn leaves falling at the moment and I love to bring them home.

I must say, this soup goes so well with the colours of these leaves.

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Roasted Chestnut and Pumpkin Soup

Soup in Winter is bliss. Particularly in Paris where Winter pierces my skin and goes straight to my bones. This soup really warms you up. Chestnuts are a plenty in Paris.

Soup for 2 people

What you’ll need:

10 chestnuts, roasted.
Half a pumpkin
A couple of slices of ginger
crème fraîche

To roast chestnuts, they should be rinsed and dried, and a small slit or cross must be made in the skin or they will burst. Pre-heat the oven to 200°CC. Roast prepared chestnuts, in small batches, for 10-20 minutes. Transfer to a tea-towel.

Roast the pumpkin in coconut oil with the ginger until soft.
Mix everything together and add a tablespoon of crème fraîche and a teaspoon of salt.

In case you didn’t know, chestnuts are very high in vitamin C and are a lot lower in calories than other nuts.

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Roast Vegetables in Coconut Oil

You’re still cooking with olive oil, aren’t you? I thought so. Stop that now! First off, let me explain why cooking with olive oil, and eating other heated oils can be dangerous.

There are many, many different kinds of fats, some of which are more delicate, or less “stable” than others, meaning that they will go off more easily. The three factors that cause fats to spoil are heat, light and oxygen.
No matter how stable a fat is, it will always in the end, succumb to one or more of these factors and putrefy. Unless we’re talking about margarine, but who would ever eat that anyway? (YUCK!)

So why can’t we cook with olive oil? It has a low “smoke point”, which means that it will begin to burn at a relatively low temperature. As soon as any fat reaches its smoke point, it begins to break down and create free radicals – those horrendous, carcinogenic, unstable molecules that damage cells and cell membranes, and are associated with the development of conditions like atherosclerosis and cancer. SCARY right? Olive oil is not suitable for stir-frying, sautéing, or any other high-heat cooking. Pour it all over your salads for sure, but stop using it to cook today. Seriously.

What can you use? Coconut oil. It’s like the God of cooking oils. Coconut oil helps to balance hormones, stabilize blood sugar levels and boost the cellular healing process. It is also known to stimulate the thyroid and reduce stress on the liver and pancreas. This increases metabolism and helps us burn fat more effectively. Additionally, coconut oil increases our energy levels, due to its easy digestive process. AND you can cook with it. Bake, roast, fry, anything! You are free to use it anyway you like. Another freakishly delicious way of using it is mixing it in with my amaze balls. It’s like an explosion of chocolate coconut goodness.

If you want a really healthy and simple meal, roast up some vegetables (any that you like roasted normally) and add some slices of ginger for zing! Add coconut oil and let it roast. You will not believe the taste. MMM.

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Raw Kale and Beetroot salad with Tahini Dressing

This salad is just divine. So earthy and refreshing. When I finally got my hands on some kale thanks to The Kale Project here in Paris, I went a bit kale nuts. Kristen from The Kale Project and I made this last week for a big vitamin boost.

You’ll need:

  • 1 bunch of curly, green kale
  • 2 spring onions
  • 1 large golden beet (or two medium) You could also use regular red beets
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 -2 cm (1 inch) of ginger
  • 1 Tbsp Tamari
  • 3 Tbsp Tahini
  • 3 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 3 Tbsp of Coconut Oil
  • 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • Juice from 1/2 lemon or lime

Wash and cup up the kale into very small pieces, otherwise it’s a bit too leafy.

Peel the beets and grate them.

Grate the carrots.

Mix everything up.

Blend the salad dressing in a blender and pour it over the salad.

Enjoy it! My J enjoyed it which is really saying something.

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