Saint Florent, where all the million euro yachts meet.

Saint Florent would be the Corsican version of Saint Tropez. It is wealthy, a display of the rich in their expensive attire and million-euro yachts. Despite this, it still remains more authentic, less “bling-bling”, and the wilderness is preserved. The Corsican’s sure know how to protect their wild island.

Below friends, is the Corsican flag. It was adopted by General of the Nation Pasquale di Paoli  in 1755 and was based on a traditional flag used previously. It portrays a Moor’s Head in black wearing a white bandana above his eyes on a white background.

Since the 11th century, the Moor’s Head has been a symbol of an African’s Head. The Moor was originally a female Moor blindfolded and wearing a necklace made of beads. No use is attested prior to 1736, when it was used by both sides during the struggle for independence.

In 1760, Genera Pasquale Paoli ordered the necklace to be removed from the head and the blindfold raised. His reason, reported by his biographers, was “Les Corses veulent y voir clair. La liberté doit marcher au flambeau de la philosophie. Ne dirait-on pas que nous craignons la lumière ?” (roughly translated: “The Corsicans want to see clearly. Freedom must walk by the torch of philosophy. Won’t they say that we fear the light?”) Later the blindfold was changed to a headband.

This pretty much sums up the Corsican mentality.

I spoke to a Corsican man and he told me that the Moor’s head was a man from Morocco.

Wonderful fresh pasta filled with typical Corsica cheese “brousse”.

If you have not yet been to Corsica, put it on your list of things to do next Summer!

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2 responses to “Saint Florent, where all the million euro yachts meet.

  1. Looks like my spiritual home….and I love the perspective from History. But, who is the young spunk in the pink bikini? Is she a sturdy young Corsican specimen? Whoever she is, looks like good blood lines.

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